Tom Lynch, MD

Thomas J. Lynch, MD
Consortium Director

Dr. Thomas J. Lynch Jr. serves as director of the Cancer Consortium and principal investigator of the Cancer Center Support Grant. Dr. Lynch is a world-renowned scientist, highly respected oncologist and successful NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center leader. As the President and Director of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center, and holder of the Raisbeck Endowed Chair, Dr. Lynch brings more than three decades of experience at highly regarded U.S. cancer centers. He has expertise in solid tumor research, precision medicine and discoveries in fundamental biology. Before joining Fred Hutch, Dr. Lynch held leadership roles as Chief Scientific Officer (CSO) at Bristol-Myers Squibb, Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Massachusetts General Physicians Organization, director of Yale Cancer Center, physician-in-chief at Yale’s Smilow Cancer Hospital, as well as chief of hematology-oncology at Massachusetts General Hospital and professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Lynch is a member of the American Association for Cancer Research, the American Society of Clinical Oncology, and the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. 


Mignon Loh, MD

Mignon Loh, MD
Consortium Deputy Director

Dr. Mignon Loh is center director for the Ben Towne Center for Childhood Cancer Research and chief of the Division of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology, Bone Marrow Transplant and Cellular Therapy, overseeing the Cancer and Blood Disorders Center at Seattle Children’s Hospital. Her research focuses on how and why leukemia progresses, as well as making genomics discoveries in the lab that translate into new and better diagnostics and therapeutics for children, adolescents and young adults with leukemia.

 


Elizabeth Swisher, MD

Elizabeth (Liz) Swisher, MD
Consortium Deputy Director

Elizabeth M. Swisher, MD, is a gynecologic oncologist, UW School of Medicine professor and Co-Leader of the Breast and Ovarian Cancer Research Program at the Fred Hutchinson/University of Washington Cancer consortium. She has a research and clinical focus on the genetics and prevention of gynecologic cancers including novel therapeutics.

Dr. Swisher earned a B.S. from Yale University and received her M.D. from the University of California at San Diego. She completed her residency at the University of Washington in Ob/Gyn and a fellowship in gynecologic oncology at Washington University St Louis. She is board certified in gynecologic oncology and obstetrics and gynecology.

Dr. Swisher's clinical interests include gynecologic cancer, clinical trials, cancer prevention, cancer genetics, and novel therapeutics.

Dr. Swisher utilizes tumor information to make personalized treatment plans for each cancer patient. She is working to make genetic testing for cancer risk accessible to all women with and without cancer so that no woman dies of a preventable hereditary cancer.

Associate Directors

Garnet Anderson, PhD

Garnet Anderson, PhD

Associate Director of Population Sciences

Dr. Garnet Anderson leads the Public Health Sciences Division at Fred Hutch, which identifies strategies that aim to reduce the incidence and mortality of cancer and other diseases primarily through studies of etiology, prevention and early detection.

Her expertise is in chronic disease prevention, women’s health and clinical trial design. She is a leader in the design and analysis of the Women’s Health Initiative, a landmark NIH-funded project that enrolled more than 160,000 women across the U.S. to find ways to prevent cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and cancer.

In 2002, Anderson and her WHI colleagues reported that hormone-replacement therapy using estrogen plus progestin increases a woman’s risk of breast cancer, stroke and heart disease and, in women over 65, doubles the risk of dementia. These findings led to a rapid drop in the use of these hormones and a noteworthy reduction in breast cancer incidence in the US and many other countries.

Subsequent analyses estimated these changes prevented 126,000 breast cancer diagnoses and saved approximately $35.2 billion in direct medical expenses over the decade since their release in the U.S. alone. 

As principal investigator of the WHI Clinical Coordinating Center, Anderson oversees the integration of many different studies within this large program. Examples include Life and Longevity After Cancer (LILAC), a program to examine late- and long-term effects of cancer and its treatment among aging cancer survivors, and the Cocoa Supplements and Multivitamin Outcomes Study (COSMOS), a randomized trial of cocoa extracts and multivitamins for the prevention of cancer and cardiovascular disease.

Her awards and honors include holding the Fred Hutch 40th Anniversary Endowed Chair. In 2020 she was named a Fellow of the American Statistical Association.

Frederick Appelbaum, MD

Frederick Appelbaum, MD

Associate Director of Clinical Research

Dr. Fred Appelbaum studies the biology and treatment of leukemias, lymphomas and other blood cancers and sees patients with these disorders. He has made numerous landmark contributions to his field. Notably, he helped develop Fred Hutch’s renowned program in blood stem cell transplantation. He also participated in the Hutch’s pioneering work to develop targeted antibody-based cancer therapies. Beyond his own research, Dr. Appelbaum has been a national leader in the conduct of clinical trials. In his current leadership role at the Hutch, Dr. Appelbaum sets the vision and standards for clinical research across the Fred Hutch/University of Washington/Seattle Children's Cancer Consortium and oversees faculty affairs.

Dr. Appelbaum was the lead author of the first paper to describe the successful use of autologous bone marrow transplantation, a therapy now used in more than 30,000 patients annually. He was also a key contributor to the discovery and development of gemtuzumab ozogamicin, known commercially as Mylotarg, the first antibody-drug conjugate approved by the Food and Drug Administration.

Bruce Clurman, MD, PhD

Bruce Clurman, MD, PhD

Associate Director of Basic Sciences
Marion Dorer, PhD, MBA

Marion Dorer, PhD, MBA

Associate Director of Shared Resources

As vice president of Research Administration, Dr. Marion Dorer oversees the administration of Fred Hutch’s three Integrated Research Centers, or IRCs, in Immunotherapy, Pathogen-Associated Malignancies and Translational Data Science. She also heads Shared Resources, the Hutch’s centralized program of 15 specialized core facilities and scientific services. Prior to this role, she served for about a year and a half as associate vice president of Interdisciplinary Science and Research Administration.

Her leadership roles have also included serving as senior administrative director of the Immunotherapy Integrated Research Center, the first of the Hutch’s IRCs. She is also former administrator of the Fred Hutch/University of Washington Cancer Consortium, a National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center. Dorer also managed the 2014 renewal of the National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute Cancer Center Support Grant, which supports infrastructure that enhances collaborative, transdisciplinary research. During the COVID-19 crisis, she led operations for the Return to Campus Study and planning for the COVID Clinical Research Center.

She began her career at the Hutch as a postdoctoral researcher in the laboratory of Dr. Nina Salama, a microbiologist and member of the Human Biology Division. Dorer earned a Ph.D. in biochemistry and molecular biology from the University of California, San Francisco and holds a master’s in business administration from the University of Washington Michael G. Foster School of Business.

Eric Holland, MD, PhD

Eric Holland, MD, PhD

Associate Director of Translational Research

Dr. Eric Holland earned a doctorate in biochemistry and molecular biology from the University of Chicago and a medical degree from Stanford University. He completed a neurosurgery residency at the University of California at Los Angeles School of Medicine and a fellowship at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Md. His postdoctoral training included work with two Nobel laureates: Dr. Paul Berg, who pioneered recombinant DNA technology at Stanford, and Dr. Harold Varmus, director of the National Cancer Institute.

 Dr. Holland was recruited to Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York, where he directed the Brain Tumor Center and built one of the nation’s most successful research and clinical programs. As a neurosurgeon and physician–scientist, he addresses the molecular basis of brain tumors to develop new, more precise approaches to their treatment. He specializes in glioblastoma, the most common brain cancer in adults, has developed mouse versions of brain cancer that mimic how tumors behave in humans, and has identified tumor cells that are resistant to standard therapies. These research findings have led to clinical trials for new drugs and drug combinations. At Fred Hutch, Dr. Holland and his colleagues will help usher in an era of precision treatment for cancer patients.

Dr. Holland has received the American Brain Tumor Association Research Award, among other honors. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, the Washington Academy of Sciences, and a member of the editorial boards of VirologyMolecular Cancer Research, the Journal of Molecular Medicine and Neoplasia

Wendy Law, PhD

Wendy Law, PhD

Associate Director of Administration

Wendy trained at the Fred Hutch Cancer Center as a graduate student and postdoc before taking on a science policy position with then-Hutch President and Nobel Laureate Dr. Lee Hartwell to help the National Cancer Institute (NCI) develop their Proteomic Initiative. She then joined the Rivkin Center for Ovarian Cancer Research as their Director of Scientific Programs and Operations. Wendy returned to the Hutch in 2016 to serve in her current role as the Associate Director of Administration for the Fred Hutch/University of Washington/Seattle Children’s Cancer Consortium with over 670 faculty members who hold over $240 million in cancer-focused research grants across the Hutch, University of Washington, and Seattle Children’s. The Consortium is nearing its 50th year of comprehensive cancer center designation from NCI.

As a graduate student and postdoc, Wendy was involved in the Hutch’s grassroots diversity, equity, and inclusion efforts including the Coalition for Minority Scientist Recruitment and Retention as the chair, the Student-Postdoc Advisory Committee, and the Community of Employees for Racial Equity (formerly the Diversity Council). She is currently on advisory committees for the Office of Community Outreach & Engagement and for the Office of Diversity, Equity & Inclusion.

Christoper Li, MD, PhD

Christoper Li, MD, PhD

Associate Director of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

Dr. Christopher Li is an epidemiologist and his research spans breast and colorectal cancer early detection, screening, etiology and survivorship. His work has identified novel risk factors related to the development of cancer and has evaluated the molecular features of cancer that are associated with poor outcomes. He also investigates the causes of disparities in cancer incidence, treatment, and mortality. Additionally, he co-leads Fred Hutch’s award-winning cancer registry, the Cancer Surveillance System, which tracks cancer incidence and survival in 13 Washington counties. Researchers everywhere use the Hutch registry data to identify and track cancer trends, causes, and adverse outcomes. Dr. Li also co-leads the Coordinating Center for NCI’s Population-based Research to Optimize the Screening Process (PROSPR) consortium focused on improving screening for cervical, colorectal, and lung cancers, and a Clinical Validation Center in NCI’s Early Detection Research Network. This latter project seeks to identify blood-based biomarkers that signal early stages of breast cancer in order to increase the chances of detecting the disease earlier when it is more treatable.

Jason Mendoza, MD, MPH

Jason Mendoza, MD, MPH

Associate Director of Community Outreach & Engagement

Dr. Jason “Jay” Mendoza is the associate program head of the cancer prevention program in the division of public health sciences at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. He is also the associate director of Community Outreach and Engagement, or COE, for the Fred Hutch/University of Washington Cancer Consortium. The Office of COE uses community-based participatory research approaches to address health inequities and reduce risk of cancer, in partnership with community-based organizations and key community leaders.

Dr. Mendoza’s own research focuses on inequities in physical activity and nutrition outcomes among youth and young adults, with a particular focus on racial/ethnic minorities, those from low socioeconomic backgrounds and cancer survivors. He develops and tests behavioral interventions in schools, communities and clinics to eliminate these inequities. Examples include programs to promote walking and biking to school, promote and track physical activity, reduce food insecurity, and manage screen time. Dr. Mendoza is also a professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine and a pediatric attending physician at Harborview Medical Center.

Dr. Mendoza earned his undergraduate degree from the University of Chicago and subsequently attended Rush Medical College where he earned his MD. He received his pediatric residency training at the UW/Seattle Children's Hospital and pursued advanced health services/community-engaged research training through the UW Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program, where he also earned a MPH through the UW School of Public Health. He spent his early faculty career at Baylor College of Medicine in the Children's Nutrition Research Center and Academic General Pediatrics. He subsequently returned to the UW/Seattle Children's in 2013.

Nina Salama, PhD

Nina Salama, PhD

Associate Director of Cancer Research Training and Education Coordination

Dr. Salama received a BS with high distinction in Honors Biology from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign in 1989. She then moved to the University of California Berkeley for her PhD in Molecular and Cell Biology. Her dissertation, conducted with Dr. Randy Schekman and supported by an NSF fellowship, focused on defining the vesicle coat (COPII) that drives movement of secretory protein cargo between the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus. Dr. Salama then became interested in the ability of pathogenic bacteria to manipulate host cells and tissues to create protected niches within the human body. This interest led her to Dr. Stanley Falkow’s laboratory in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology in 1995 for a postdoctoral fellowship supported by the Jane Coffin Child Memorial Fund for Medical Research. While Falkow’s group studied many pathogens, Dr. Salama spearheaded the development of genetic and genomic tools as well as an animal model of infection for the study of Helicobacter pylori, the first bacteria to be designated as a carcinogen by the World Health Organization.

In 2001 Dr. Salama was recruited to Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center as an Assistant Professor in Human Biology. Now a full professor, her work focuses on the role of genetic variation and cell morphology in chronic stomach colonization by. H. pylori as well as how this organism modifies the stomach tissue environment to simultaneously promote long term bacterial persistence and preneoplastic progression. Dr. Salama prioritizes training and mentoring of the next scientific generation. She was co-Director of the Molecular and Cellular Biology Graduate Program jointly administered University of Washington and Fred Hutch from 2016-2022 where she spearheaded a number of initiatives to promote recruitment and retention of historically underrepresented groups in STEM with a particular focus on more equitable access and improved mentoring.